August 8, 2015
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Youth News:
Texting & Driving
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August 8, 2015
  A Fox News program last July reported a statistic from the Virginia Tech Transportation Institute regarding various driving distractions. They stated that people who perform TWD  (texting while driving) are 23 times more likely to crash. This is an extremely high number. The Fox News report also went on to claim that "drivers' distractions contribute to 24% of police reported crashes." 
   State law-makers around the country have been addressing the issue of TWD among youth.  On the website of the Governors Highway Safety Association (GHSA), increasing numbers of states have banned TWD.  At http://www.ghsa.org under the heading "Cell Phone and Texting," TWD has been banned in 19 states thus far. Each state has details of the TWD laws as well as regulations governing cell phone usage. In Arkansas, TWD has only been banned since October 1, 2009.  To provide feedback on the TWD law, Today's THV (Channel 11 News) invited Little Rock Police Department Lieutenant Terry Hastings on their show: "Texting is something that you've got to look at, got to enter, and keep on glancing at, and that changes the focus of your eyes," he said.  "It takes attention away from driving. You can text for about a split second and that is all you need [for a harmful crash]."
   According to a CBS news report, 90% percent of Americans believe TWD should be banned.  Even a growing number of young people feel that way. Several high school students enrolled in a Driver's Ed course that instructed them about dangers of TWD. The students had to drive around cones in the road and be watchful of the sudden appearance of rowdy drivers.  A female student commented about the learning experience: " I couldn't even get my password on the phone.  It was a touch screen phone and you have to look at it."  She added, "Missing three out of four red lights was enough to say to me that I should not do it."
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 Youth News:
Texting & Driving


 A Fox News program last July reported a statistic from the Virginia Tech Transportation Institute regarding various driving distractions. They stated that people who perform TWD  (texting while driving) are 23 times more likely to crash. This is an extremely high number. The Fox News report also went on to claim that "drivers' distractions contribute to 24% of police reported crashes." 
   State law-makers around the country have been addressing the issue of TWD among youth.  On the website of the Governors Highway Safety Association (GHSA), increasing numbers of states have banned TWD.  At http://www.ghsa.org under the heading "Cell Phone and Texting," TWD has been banned in 19 states thus far. Each state has details of the TWD laws as well as regulations governing cell phone usage. In Arkansas, TWD has only been banned since October 1, 2009.  To provide feedback on the TWD law, Today's THV (Channel 11 News) invited Little Rock Police Department Lieutenant Terry Hastings on their show: "Texting is something that you've got to look at, got to enter, and keep on glancing at, and that changes the focus of your eyes," he said.  "It takes attention away from driving. You can text for about a split second and that is all you need [for a harmful crash]."
   According to a CBS news report, 90% percent of Americans believe TWD should be banned.  Even a growing number of young people feel that way. Several high school students enrolled in a Driver's Ed course that instructed them about dangers of TWD. The students had to drive around cones in the road and be watchful of the sudden appearance of rowdy drivers.  A female student commented about the learning experience: " I couldn't even get my password on the phone.  It was a touch screen phone and you have to look at it."  She added, "Missing three out of four red lights was enough to say to me that I should not do it."

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*Global Publics: Economic Conditions Are Bad
*Iran Nuclear Agreement Meets With Public Skepticism